Life after death

There is life after death.

Now, I know that sounds like a very rash statement, and one which has kept philosophers, scholars, sceptics, clerics and a fair few others busy for some few millennia.

However, as doctors, and healthcare professionals, we often seem to forget that there truly is life going on after death, or, perhaps more accurately, we get very easily distracted into concentrating on the life that has just come to occupy our attentions rather more than the one which has just ended within our sphere of influence.

Now, that may be entirely right and proper, modern medicine tends to have more to offer the living than the dead, but I there is an opportunity to practice medicine which all too often passes us by. It is not a cutting edge therapy, a new model of care or anything special, but it does take time, and effort.

On a couple of occasions recently I have encountered this life after death, and the outcomes of those meetings have changed the way I look at where our duty as physicians ends.

The two patients who have promoted this thinking passed away under the care of my team, and instead of the usual scurrying off of the house officer to fill in the death certificate +/- cremation form, we made appointments to meet with the relatives of the deceased as they came to collect the paperwork.

The discussions, questions and conversations which these meetings involved were, I hope useful for the relatives of the deceased, and certainly seemed to play a role in clearing up any misunderstandings, and allowed a chance to discuss events with less urgency than when their loved one remained alive but very ill.

I think the main thing these experiences bought home for me was the feeling that it is possible to continue to serve, care and help the healing process, even after death.

So when I say that there is life after death, I mean that we should remember those left behind by a death, and remember that we have some duty of care to them to.

I know that meeting with relatives after every death is unlikely to be practical, and that my colleagues in primary are probably better placed to help pick up the pieces than me, but I’ll do my utmost to be available, open and honest, and that way I hope to be able to assist a healing process, where clearly I wasn’t able to effect a cure for another.

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