Every day is a school day

Doctors have a strange sort of a career path.

There are few other industries where professionals who have passed long degrees, taken postgraduate exams, been working in their chosen field for up to 10 years, developed expertise, possibly gained PhDs and are still routinely referred to as ‘junior’

We work long hours (albeit reduced over the past few years by European legislation) and see hundreds, if not, thousands of patients in the time it takes to become a senior doctor.

These long hours have long been held up as an essential part of the training of a doctor – and hark back to the apprentice model of medical education which is where medical training has its roots.  In this model, by working alongside a master, one gains experience, tries out new techniques under supervision, and slowly becomes skilled enough to be considered an independent practitioner.

This model has been eroded somewhat in recent times by the move towards a competency based approach to curricula whereby one progresses, not through a slow acquisition of skills, but seemingly by hopping through the right hoops at the right time and getting the right box ticked on a bewildering number of forms  – all of which purport to confer – confirm – or convey competence in the procedure or process onto the trainee being appraised or assessed.

This competency based approach is lamented by those who feel that it has reduced medical education to a simple process of tick-boxes and has missed the essence of the apprenticeship model of learning.

But what is it that has changed?

I don’t think that juniors spend significantly less time being supervised any more – indeed the more senior members of the medical team are far more visible nowadays than they ever were in the past.  As I have progressed up the grades, it has become the norm to have registrars on-site, clerking patients, and twice daily Consultant ward rounds, even on the weekends.  So supervision has not necessarily gone – so why is the apprentice model no longer working?

I think that part of it is the acceptance by trainees that training can never be mixed with service, and that one cannot learn when doing a ‘menial task’ such as re-siting a cannula, or re-writing a drug chart on an on-call shift.

Indeed, this idea that learning can only take place in the lecture theatre, or when time has been set aside, or one is told “now here is an opportunity to learn” is, in my view, one of the most disabling attitudes, which prevents the aqcuisition of experience, dumbs down the privilege of providing a service to patients in need, and encourages trainees to resent time spent learning the trade which they are likely to follow for the rest of their lives.

In a discussion the other day I highlighted that I take the view that every day is a school day.  One should never go home without learning something.

This view has been backed up by the observations of a cohort of NHS graduate scheme participants who recently shadowed junior doctors.  Almost universally they were struck by the fact that junior doctors are being actively trained the whole time.  And when one takes a moment to think about it – every chance conversation about a clinical problem, every x-ray meeting, every checking of an idea with a senior is a moment of training.  That conversation may take place in the course of everyday service, but the information is gold-dust.

We have access to the experience, mistakes, triumphs, and disasters of our seniors, and if we only open our ears, we can take advantage of all of that.

Today was an example – a patient in clinic is proving to be a diagnostic challenge – are we to do this, do that, do nothing, or something else?  A brief conversation with my consultant, and I am now researching the cost to the NHS of medically unexplained breathlessness, and how this can be addressed, using a combination of medical reasoning, judicious use of ‘tests’, coaching techniques, and communication skills.

So – if you feel that you are stuck in a dead-end service job, that you learn nothing on a daily basis, and are longing for a conference where  you can return to the comfort of a didactic lecture – I think you might be missing out on a world of learning and knowledge every day.

Keep your eyes and ears open, and I am convinced that you will find that every day is a school day.

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3 thoughts on “Every day is a school day

  1. Every day’s a school day is my tongue in cheek mantra for life! It’s really nice to hear from a doc that recognises “learning” doesn’t just exist in those golden ticket moments when am “expert” sits next to a patient’s bed and “tells” you the medical “truth” about the “condition”. This is true for all of us – would be great if we redefined learning something that helps us change and grow, as you have here 🙂

  2. Toby, I’m pleased our conversation has given birth to a blog on this topic.

    However, I am still sceptical about the ‘every day is a school day’ mantra. Most days are school days… BUT even whilst at school, there are some days where you learn a bit less. Fi

    • Toby, this posting really resonates with me. I find it interesting to note the ways in which medicine sometimes over-emphasises the learner status of particular workers. ‘Students’ and “trainees’ are defined by the formal curriculum models which shape, directly and indirectly, the opportunities to learn through engagement with the workplace. Much less attention is given to the ways in which those who have got through gate keeping stages (ie GPs, Consultants) continue to engage with the curriculum of the workplace – those moments where they are puzzled, where something doesn’t go according to plan, where they have a chance but challenging conversation with a colleague, where they have to change their practice because of new technologies, or protocols, or team members. I welcome an ongoing dialogue about the workplace as the curriculum (rather the place upon which the curriculum is imposed) – thanks for this great posting!

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